Tag Archives: well-being

Happiness without TV

Kromar Living without the Screen

“TV doesn’t really seem to satisfy people over the long haul the way that social involvement or reading a newspaper does,” says University of Maryland sociologist John P. Robinson. “It’s more passive and may provide escape – especially when the news is as depressing as the economy itself. The data suggest to us that the TV habit may offer short-run pleasure at the expense of long-term malaise.”

 

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Facebook lowers self-esteem and well-being

Facebook LogoutI mean who is really surprised by the impact of Facebook on self-esteem? In Europe the activities in Facebook are declining, which is widely discussed in books, ebooks and articles.

A study made by University Michigan social psychologist Ethan Kross confirms that Facebook use predicts decline in happiness. Ethan Kross says: “On the surface, Facebook provides an invaluable resource for fulfilling the basic human need for social connection. But rather than enhance well-being, we found that Facebook use predicts the opposite result—it undermines it.”

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Exercise for your self-esteem

Penn State researchers found that people’s satisfaction with life was higher on days when they exercised more than usual. So extending your normal exercise routine by a few minutes may be the solution how to boost your self-esteem.

Satisfaction with life is just another expression why a high self-esteem is so important. Are you satisfied with your life? If not, this could be your solution.

“We found that people’s satisfaction with life was directly impacted by their daily physical activity,” said Jaclyn Maher, graduate student in kinesiology. “The findings reinforce the idea that physical activity is a health behavior with important consequences for daily well-being and should be considered when developing national policies to enhance satisfaction with life.”

“Emerging adults are going through a lot of changes; they are leaving home for the first time and attending college or starting jobs,” said Maher. “As a result, their satisfaction with life can plummet.”

“Shifts in depression, anxiety and stress would be expected to influence a person’s satisfaction with life at any given point in time,” said David Conroy, professor of kinesiology. “In addition, fatigue can be a barrier to engaging in physical activity, and a high Body Mass Index associated with being overweight may cause a person to be less satisfied in a variety of ways.”

The researchers were able to determine that the amount of physical activity a person undertakes in a particular day directly influences his or her satisfaction with life. Specifically, the team found that by exercising just a little more than usual a person can significantly improve his or her satisfaction with life.

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Being an experience shopper makes one happy

San Francisco State University psychologists have found that buying life experiences makes people happier than buying possessions. What does that mean “buying life experiences”? It means buying concert tickets or a weekend away, rather than hitting the mall for material items.

“We know that being an ‘experience shopper’ is linked to greater well being,” said Howell, whose 2009 paper on purchasing experiences challenged the adage that money can’t buy happiness. He suggests it could be easier to change your spending habits than your personality traits. “Even for people who naturally find themselves drawn to material purchases, our results suggest that getting more of a balance between traditional purchases and those that provide you with an experience could lead to greater life satisfaction and well being.”

What do you think about this idea?

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Centenarians have strong esteem for life

In Germany the number of the centenarians has more than doubled within the last ten years. The fact that these centenarians today are spiritually and physically fitter than those of former generations, is found by a representative investigation of researchers of the university of Heidelberg which they made with people at the age of 100 years in and around Heidelberg.

The study showed a comprehensive picture of centenarians and their life situation. It appears that psychological strengths such as will to live, meaning of life and optimism are more important for a high quality of life and inner contentment than performance ability or health.

“We asked people whose life leans towards to the end. Those who look in spite of the close end of life still optimistically ahead, appear to be more content with their life. In comparison to that health, cognitive efficiency and social aspects are with few exceptions clearly insignificant for the quality of life“, explains Christoph Rott, one of the researchers.

He added: “To sum up, the results of our study show that experiences of losing life quality for example through health issues have much less impact on the centenarians’ general well-being. They live much more the positive side of age through a strong esteem for life.”

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